Highlighting the unseen artists behind comic books

Rob Stull says black comic book artists have always been in the industry, they just haven’t gotten the visibility they deserve.

Growing up in Brookline as a comic book geek, Rob Stull devoured iconic titles like Spider-Man, Captain America, Iron Man, and Batman.

As an African-American, he was especially enthralled by Black Panther and X-Men’s Storm, as well as other characters of color in Green Lantern. Stull assumed — correctly, of course — that even these superheroes of color were mostly created by white men like Marvel’s Stan Lee.

Continue @ The Boston Globe

National Geographic explores fiction for first time with new kids book series

Exacad Cha 1 Spot

For 130 years, the name National Geographic has stood for exploration of science and culture in the real world. Now, in an unprecedented move, Nat Geo’s kids division is exploring the world of fiction to spur children to learn more about their planet.

On Sept. 4, Nat Geo will debut the first in its seven-book children’s fiction series, Explorer Academy. The initial installment, Nebula Secret, will roll out in the United States and more than a dozen other countries that include the United Kingdom, China, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Romania, Taiwan and Turkey. Subsequent books in the series will be published every six months.

Continue @ USA TODAY

Judy Blume wants to know which of her books you want to see adapted

Earlier this week, EW compiled a list of 50 books that deserve to be adapted into a TV show or movie. The list of great books that haven’t yet been adapted is, of course, even longer than that. The stories of Judy Blume, for instance, have remained on the page despite millions of sales and dozens of awards. That might change soon, however. Blume tweeted on Thursday that she was meeting with “many talented people” in Los Angeles about possible adaptations. She even asked her followers to chime in with suggestions for which of her books they would like to see on screen.

Continue @ EW.com

What It’s Really Like To Quit Your Job To Travel The World

The author traveling through India.

I was raised to understand adulthood to mean a traditional path of college (I was the first in my family to graduate with a degree), job, marriage, house and then, children. I spent a semester abroad while attending a university, then went to work in very corporate environments in marketing and public relations in Boston, where I became a pro at hoarding vacation days to fit in trips to destinations such as Morocco and India ― places that require far more than four or five vacation days.

I spent my 20s and 30s straddling a life of traditional work while still daydreaming of adventure. I was miserable going to an office every day, but I ignored my desire to pursue non-traditional options because it seemed terrifying and irresponsible.

Continue @ HuffPost

What are luxury hotels doing to save the environment?

London’s Kit Kemp-designed Ham Yard Hotel has been replacing plastic items with plant-based alternatives.

With their beautiful amenities and extravagant goodies, luxury hotels do not immediately conjure up visions of sustainability. But the fact is that luxury hotels have been adopting sustainable measures for the last 15 years or so. With environmental issues surging globally, some luxury hotels are making their efforts more visible, communicable, effective and relevant.

Continue @ South China Morning Post

13 Best Hotels in Boston

Whether it’s for business, for college, for foodies, or for history-loving travelers, Boston plays host to countless visitors every year. Much like so many other aspects of the city, the hotel offerings are a delightful, ever-evolving mix of old meets new. From exclusive Back Bay addresses, to converted prisons (trust us on that one), to charming Cambridge boutique properties, there are so many options to explore. Here, a selection of our favorite places for where to stay in Boston.

Continue @ Condé Nast Traveler

See Inside the World’s First Intertidal Art Gallery

Coralarium Maldives Statues

Translation: It’s half underwater.

As the pioneer of underwater sculpture, Jason deCaires Taylor has already amassed an impressive list of firsts, from designing the largest subaquatic museum off the coast of Cancun to building the world’s largest underwater statue—a 60-ton, 18-foot-tall statue of a young Bahamian girl.

Continue @ Coastal Living

Appalachian Music Celebrates Modern Culture, Immigrant Past

“To me the difference between a violin, and a fiddle, is that a violin never had a beer spilled on it… That is the difference.”

Will Fanning laughs at his joke as he rocks on his chair outside his home in Mingo, West Virginia. Fanning is a musician and hotel owner born in Ireland. But now he lives deep in the Appalachian Mountains of the United States.

“The Irish nearly every day have a song and play music,” said Fanning. “So that tradition is kind of bred into me. My family, every weekend we’d play music at the house.”

Like Fanning, many in the area continue the traditions from their families’ immigrant history including a kind of music called old-time.

Continue @ Voice of America