This Beloved Street Photography Bible Gets an Exciting New Edition – Flavorwire

Street photography didn’t start with Henri Cartier-Bresson. Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre, Charles Nègre, and other predecessors were capturing the comings and goings on the Boulevard du Temple in Paris and beyond in the 19th century. A detailed history of street photography was first collected in a 1994 landmark book called Bystander, by artist Joel Meyerowitz and curator Colin Westerbeck; Laurence King Publishing is releasing a newly revised edition (available November 7), featuring 27 additional photographers, a new chapter devoted to digital photography, and a historical revisit. From the publisher’s press release:

Full Story: This Beloved Street Photography Bible Gets an Exciting New Edition – Flavorwire

THINK: Fresh Opinions, Sharp Analyses and Powerful Essays | NBC News

This has to be one of the coolest things I’ve seen in a very long time.  So beautiful.  I highly recommend clicking on the link and watching the video associated with this story.  Amazing.

Deaf Poet’s Visual Poetry: Creative Storytelling Without Words Poet Douglas Ridloff creates American Sign Language poetry and performs at ASL Slam, a creative outlet for deaf people.

Video: THINK: Fresh Opinions, Sharp Analyses and Powerful Essays | NBC News

There’s going to be a Hunter S. Thompson TV series – NME

MGM Television has announced that it will be producing a television series based on the late Hunter S. Thompson’s life.The show will be called ‘Fear and Loathing’, after the writer’s 1971 novel, ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream’.

Full Story: There’s going to be a Hunter S. Thompson TV series – NME

Catch up on Hunter’s work for yourself at Amazon

 

Cambridge University moves to ‘decolonise’ English literature curriculum | London Evening Standard

I think it’s rather appalling that it takes a “movement” to have these writers included, I would have thought they were long ago.  Great writing is great writing – no matter the ethnicity / religion of the author.  Still, I’m glad to see the change is finally happening.

Students have campaigned to 'decolonise' the university

The University of Cambridge’s English faculty is taking steps to “decolonise” the curriculum in response to a student campaign.

Full Story: Cambridge University moves to ‘decolonise’ English literature curriculum | London Evening Standard

There’s going to be a Hunter S. Thompson TV series – NME

This should be an “interesting” watch, to say the least 😉

MGM Television has announced that it will be producing a television series based on the late Hunter S. Thompson’s life.The show will be called ‘Fear and Loathing’, after the writer’s 1971 novel, ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream’.

Full Story: There’s going to be a Hunter S. Thompson TV series – NME

 

Catch up on Hunter’s work for yourself at Amazon

Jason Reynolds on ‘Long Way Down’ and how he became a writer – The Washington Post

All of which asks the question Reynolds posed to his young audience: “How is it that a kid like me, a kid who grew up reading no books, eventually became a man who writes books for y’all?”

The tale of Reynolds’s transformation from a non-reader living on the edge in Oxon Hill, Md., to a literary celebrity is the kind of relatable story he wished he’d read when he was a kid. “It’s hard to be what you can’t see,” he said in an interview in the District, where he lives part-time.

Full Story: Jason Reynolds on ‘Long Way Down’ and how he became a writer – The Washington Post

Illustrating a better world: ‘Malala’s Magic Pencil’ invokes youth voices

What if you had a magic pencil with the power to create anything you wanted? What would you draw? What would you erase?

As a child Malala Yousafzai, the youngest Nobel Prize Laureate, dreamed for such a pencil, one to draw a real soccer ball for her brothers or beautiful dresses for her mother. One to draw a more peaceful world, an equal place for boys and girls.

Full Story: Illustrating a better world: ‘Malala’s Magic Pencil’ invokes youth voices

High-schooler putting more books in kids’ hands

This is one of my favorite recent stories I’ve found.  A teenager who brings her young enthusiasm and hard work ethic (that “get it done”) mentality along with fresh out-of-the-box thinking.  So nice to see this and more organizations need to encourage the youth to get involved and offer solutions.  They are smarter, more energetic and more compassionate than many assume.

What a wonderful story.

“I was shocked,” said Vaher, an avid reader since an early age, who often visited the library with her mom to catch up on summer reading as a child. “But most kids, their parents are working throughout the summer and so they don’t have the chance to go to a summer reading program.

”Vaher visited the Stowe Family YMCA in Belmont and — in coordination with its director, Susan Mosk — learned some 300 kids regularly attend the branch’s afterschool and summer activity programs. While the branch has a large playroom with TV and video games, Vaher noticed it only had a small bookshelf and lacked a comfortable reading environment for kids.

That’s when she envisioned her opportunity to bring that option directly to kids at the YMCA.

Full Story : High-schooler putting more books in kids’ hands

NH Girl Collects Books For Texas Schools After Hurricane Harvey « CBS Boston

It started with the generosity of a child and it’s going to help hundreds of kids in hurricane ravaged Texas. When Hurricane Harvey tore through Houston, it didn’t spare schools or libraries. So a 6-year-old from Salem, New Hampshire decided to help, with books.

First grader Brooklyn Murray saw what happened in Texas. “It was so bad and people lost a lot of stuff,” she says. She wanted to help. “We thought that it would be a good idea to collect books because they lost, like, their houses, their money, their wallets and everything,” she says.

Full Story : NH Girl Collects Books For Texas Schools After Hurricane Harvey « CBS Boston