What It’s Really Like To Quit Your Job To Travel The World

The author traveling through India.

I was raised to understand adulthood to mean a traditional path of college (I was the first in my family to graduate with a degree), job, marriage, house and then, children. I spent a semester abroad while attending a university, then went to work in very corporate environments in marketing and public relations in Boston, where I became a pro at hoarding vacation days to fit in trips to destinations such as Morocco and India ― places that require far more than four or five vacation days.

I spent my 20s and 30s straddling a life of traditional work while still daydreaming of adventure. I was miserable going to an office every day, but I ignored my desire to pursue non-traditional options because it seemed terrifying and irresponsible.

Continue @ HuffPost

How Book Vending Machines Can Help Those Living In America’s Book Deserts

Low-income neighborhoods in major cities across America have book deserts — a limited access to children’s books negatively impacts children’s vocabulary and reading comprehension. Book vending machines, installed in high-trafficked areas within these book deserts by NYC’s JetBlue airline, might be able to combat the problem.

In 2016, NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development led a study in partnership with JetBlue. The results shed a light on the lack of children’s books in low-income neighborhoods across the three major cities of Detroit, Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles. Those living in concentrated poverty, the study holds, have a much more limited access to print: They live in book deserts. The socioeconomic inequalities can be stark and they come at a cost, given that reading books as a child can have an out-sized impact on someone’s reading skills across the rest of their life.

Continue @ Forbes

This Photographer Is Making Learning Special for the Differently-Abled

It’s not our disabilities; it’s our abilities that count.” – Chris Burke

Delhi-based photographer and copywriter Mohit Ahuja started an organisation to break stereotypes against disabilities, which he christened Know Disability.

In 2015, Mohit quit his job and put together a 10-day photography workshop for people with disabilities. There were a dozen participants, of which five persisted and continued with Know Disability.

In an exclusive interview with The Better India, Mohit speaks about how he started the organisation, the challenges of dealing with parents of special needs kids and breaking stereotypes along the way.

Continue @ The Better India

As millennials embrace RVs, next wave of travel trailers go hip

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In 2015, Jessi and Valerie Smith took a radical step toward downsizing.

The couple, both 30 at the time, decided to trade in their three-bedroom San Francisco home to take up residence in an 8-square-foot TAB Teardrop camper.

There were a few growing, or in this case, shrinking, pains. They would bump their heads on the low ceilings and grew weary of having to convert the bed into a living area each day. But they both agree that it was the best decision they could have ever made.

“It probably wouldn’t work for everyone,” said Valerie, “but it actually brought us closer.”

Continue @ USA TODAY

How one teen explores — and escapes — through music

Rio Samaniego by Vanessa Valencia-Lopez. Portrait Project High School Journalism Institute 2018.

Rio Samaniego came home from another isolating day of school.

Once again, he sat alone during lunch, ostracized by his seventh-grade peers.

He lay in his bed and put on a new album recommended to him by a friend: “Worlds” by Porter Robinson. To Rio, the album conveyed nostalgia and sadness, themes that he related to and distracted him from the bullying at school.

“You can block out the negative aspects of life,” Rio said. “Some people use poetry or art, but I use music.”

Continue @ OregonLive.com

Michigan family sells their home to travel the world with young daughter

Source: WXMI

A Michigan couple and their young daughter are trading in their careers to travel the world and grow closer as a family.

Ben and Kelly Lutz are selling their home and heading to Europe. Then they’re going to Southeast Asia, then to Germany and then likely a few more stops before heading back to the mitten state.

The young couple, along with their young daughter Liesel, is taking a break from the rat race and traveling the world.

“House is gone, jobs are gone,” they said.

Continue @ WNEM Saginaw

With Culinary Medicine, Doctors Are Finally Learning About Food

Culinary medicine enables doctors to talk with patients about how nutrition and food choices affect their health an

Imagine visiting a doctor for the first time. If you’re suffering from weight issues and seeking help with your exercise and eating habits, it’s only natural to fear you’ll get harangued with judgment. You may anticipate questions like “What do you eat?” and “How often do you exercise?”

But thanks to a new wave of physicians versed in culinary medicine, you’re more likely to hear this question: “What do you like to eat?”

“I think patients are afraid to talk about what they’re eating for fear they’ll be judged or scolded,” says Dr. Brian Nagle, a resident at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital.

Continue @ HuffPost

The Best Places to Travel When You’re Newly Single

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We won’t pretend to know what happened between you two. There might have been a fight about whether or not organic avocados are a liberal myth, or if it’s blasphemy to keep your sheets tucked under the mattress while you sleep with two sweaty people underneath?! You’re such an egocentric — geez, get your stream of consciousness out of this introduction, reader; we’re trying to make our point.

Anyway, it’s over. For-real over, change your relationship status on Facebook over, pound a screw-top bottle of red and howl at the moon over. Now what? You might feel heartache or relief or relieved heartache or plain ol’ bell-rung shock. Then you realize: You’re back to being single. And being single is fuuuuuuuuun.

Continue @ Thrillist

As she battled and beat cancer, Kathryn Dyer found peace and passion through photography

In the latest episode of the sixth season of Adorama’s Through the Lens, the focus is on photographer Kathryn Dyer. Sacramento-based Dyer first forayed into the world of Instagram and became more serious about photography when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Her husband bought a camera for them to share and take Kathryn’s mind off her battle with cancer through nature photography sessions.

Continue @ imaging resource

Photographer fights fear, anxieties from behind the camera lens

Melanie Parent's "A Distance Nearer Home" photography

For more than 20 years, fear and anxiety ruled Melanie Parent’s life.

The northwest Louisiana native avoided going out in public whenever possible, afraid of what dangers may lie in wait for her outside.

“I wouldn’t leave the house. I wouldn’t travel. I was afraid of going on trips,” Parent said. “I was afraid of getting into a car accident.”

Continue @ Shreveport Times