New Chris Cornell music video released

According to CBS news Chris wanted the new video released on World Refugee Day.

Eric Esrailian, who produced the video, said Cornell filmed the video shortly before he died. Esrailian added that the rock singer wanted the video to be released on World Refugee Day.

Cornell and his family toured refugee camps in Greece in April, and there they decided that The Chris and Vicky Cornell Foundation would focus its efforts on child refugees.

 

‘Take Two Songs and Call Me in the Morning’: How Music Might Be Your Next Prescription Drug | Outside Online

In 2013, this question spurred Ketki Karanam, former head of product design at Nokia, biologist Marko Ahtisaari, and postdoc student Yadid Ayzenberg to lay the groundwork for the Sync Project, a Boston-based company whose main goal is to develop music as precision medicine. For the past two years, Sync has been spearheading various studies that look at the connection between music and the mind. The company has collaborated with advisers from Berklee College of Music, MIT Media Lab, and Spotify to gather dat

Source: ‘Take Two Songs and Call Me in the Morning’: How Music Might Be Your Next Prescription Drug | Outside Online

How ‘America’s Got Talent’ Standout, Deaf Singer Mandy Harvey, ‘Feels’ The Music | CPR

The singer, who moved from Colorado to Florida, learned how to “feel” the music, as she explained to Colorado Matters host Ryan Warner in 2010. “I’ll feel and concentrate the drums through the floor, through my feet and then the bass through your chest. And then if a saxophone player is next to me then it will be on my arm. So you just designate different parts of your body so you can concentrate on who’s playing what and when,” she said.

Source: How ‘America’s Got Talent’ Standout, Deaf Singer Mandy Harvey, ‘Feels’ The Music | CPR

Mary Meeker’s 2017 Internet Trends: What Do They Mean For Music?

We’ve come a long way from the days of “Napster Fear”…

One intriguing, unspoken pattern emerges from the report: all of the top six companies by global market capitalization in 2017—Apple, Google, Amazon, Facebook, Tencent and Alibaba, a combined market value of over US$3 trillion—are making aggressive investments in music. Apple, Google and Amazon are a handful of the players sparring for market share in the streaming wars, alongside more music-centric competitors Spotify, Pandora, SoundCloud, Tidal and Deezer. Facebook is looking to secure music licensing deals with major labels amidst its growing interest in video, and recently hired former YouTube exec Tamara Hrivnak to lead its global music strategy and business development.

Across the Pacific, Tencent Music Entertainment Group just signed a landmark licensing deal with Universal Music Group, atop its existing deals with Sony and Warner; its music streaming and download service QQ Music has over 400 million monthly active users, over three times as many as those on Spotify. Alibaba Music extended its licensing deal with BMG, and launched an artist-management venture with video site Youku; its parent, Alibaba Digital Media and Entertainment Group, plans to invest over 50 billion yuan (US$7.4 billion) in new projects over the next three years.

Source: Mary Meeker’s 2017 Internet Trends: What Do They Mean For Music?

Boulder Acoustic Society’s Scott McCormick Traded in Music for Photography | Westword

After an argument with the powers-that-be over a Toyota contract valued at roughly six million dollars, McCormick was told that his services were no longer needed.

“The possibility of having that amount of money made me a nutcase,” he says. “I was just no good. I thought, ‘Is that what this is gonna end up being? I’m gonna be a weirdo that no one wants to be around for some stupid soundscapes and jingles?’ I tried real hard, and then I failed real hard.”

Never hesitate to change direction when you feel you need to.

Source: Boulder Acoustic Society’s Scott McCormick Traded in Music for Photography | Westword

Apple Music: $10 billion a year on content is possible

Apple Music gets little respect compared to, say, Spotify. Here’s why that’s likely to change.

From the article…

When Apple Music launched two years ago, it had been almost nine years since Spotify was founded.

As a result, perhaps, Apple Music was never really embraced by the mainstream business press.

Gizmodo asked at its launch: “How Is Apple Music Actually Different From Spotify (Or Anything Else)?” (It called it “yet another music streaming service.”) TechCrunch wondered if it was “Ping 2.0?” Their final verdict on the service: “It’s OK.” (It also thought Apple should offer a free tier.)

Two years later, Apple Music has 27 million paid subscribers. Assuming they’re all paying $10 a month (and we know a few are not), that’s a nice little $3.2 billion annual revenue stream Apple has generated.

 

Read more at the link…

Source: Apple Music: $10 billion a year on content is possible