Drop your words into giant origami boat for National Poetry Day competition 

What a clever way to  celebrate National Poetry Day!

The boat is part of a competition, inviting people  to submit words related to the sea into it to be in to win dinner ...

The public are invited to drop a word relating to the sea, along with contact details, into the boat. They will receive an instant prize of a biscuit and a poem from one of two new collections of poetry, Keel & Drift by Adrienne Jansen and Everything is Here by Rob Hack and go into the draw to win dinner for two and a cruise on a boat in Mana or copies of these collections.

Full Story:  Drop your words into giant origami boat for National Poetry Day competition | Stuff.co.nz

Four book series that are shaping the future of science fiction on television | Ars Technica

Looks like television is going to just keep getting better and better!

If recent Hollywood deals are any indication, science fiction on TV is about to get even more interesting and complex. The trend started with the surprising announcement in late 2016 that Lin Manuel-Miranda’s next project—after completing his run on Hamilton and writing the music for Moana—would be to adapt Patrick Rothfuss’ cult fantasy series The Kingkiller Chronicle for TV and film. Just in the past two months, three more gamechanging options were announced: HBO will adapt Nnedi Okorafor’s Who Fears Deat

Full Story: Four book series that are shaping the future of science fiction on television | Ars Technica 

11 books to help you talk to your kids about race and racism | BabyCenter Blog

I know many parents are confused or concerned on how to begin the conversation of race when it comes to their children, especially after recent events.

A book (or a film, cartoon, etc) can help by being a non-threatening jumping off point for the conversation.  This blog has done a good job of giving you a starting point by featuring eleven different books approaching this topic from a variety of angles.

Take a look at the list & don’t be afraid to have the difficult conversations.

Article: 11 books to help you talk to your kids about race and racism | BabyCenter Blog

Cleveland Kids’ Book Bank gives hundreds of thousands of free books to kids in need – News 5 Cleveland

Tucked away in a warehouse in midtown Cleveland, you will find thousands upon thousands of books.

They’re brand-new, slightly used, and there’s every single genre you can imagine.

It is the Cleveland Kids’ Book Bank, a program with the goal of putting books in the hands of every child in Cuyahoga County.

Full Story: Cleveland Kids’ Book Bank gives hundreds of thousands of free books to kids in need – News 5 Cleveland

19th Annual Battle of the Books takes place at ECC South | wivb.com

I would have absolutely LOVED this as a kid!!

Twenty three teams. One hundred and fifty nine competitors.14 libraries and five books. That’s what makes up Buffalo’s Battle of the Books.

Mary Jean Jakubowski, Director of Erie County’s Public Library System, told News 4, “It is an exciting jeopardy round program, that will go through a series of eliminations answering unbelievably specific questions about 5 books that these children have been reading.”

Full Story:  19th Annual Battle of the Books takes place at ECC South | wivb.com

How to Share Books on a Kindle With Family and Friends | Digital Trends

One of the best things about Amazon‘s iconic ebook reader is its ever-growing library. At last count, the Kindle Store boasted more than 6 million books, magazines, and newspapers. But you needn’t keep them all to yourself — Amazon makes it easy to share books on a Kindle with friends, family, and your closest acquaintances. It’s like the digital equivalent of lending out a hardcover, minus the coffee stains and musty binding. If there’s a con to Kindle’s book-sharing tools, however, it’s that they can be a

Full Story:  How to Share Books on a Kindle With Family and Friends | Digital Trends

The secret ingredients to a great children’s book

Finding a great children’s book is a matter of necessity for parents and teachers — and something the rest of us tend to ignore, at least until we have no choice.

But whether we realize it or not, most of us also have a strong connection to children’s books. And waiting until we need a quick birthday present for a niece, nephew or friend’s kid means we’re more likely to buy from a small, stagnant pool of perennial best sellers, in turn skipping over dozens of worthy titles that have the same potential to influence young readers the way classics like “Goodnight Moon” or “Where the Wild Things Are” have for decades.

Full Story:  The secret ingredients to a great children’s book

Bringing medieval texts to a contemporary audience | Stanford News

Curated by Stanford faculty and students, the GMS is an online, interactive collection of medieval texts and their translations. It primarily features shorter texts – never before translated into English – and offers non-experts a gateway into the literature of the Middle Ages.

This is one of my favorite stories of the day!  I have a real fascination with Illuminated Manuscripts so this right up my alley.  Please visit the article at Stanford for more information on the project and exactly what you can find at the website.   Bringing medieval texts to a contemporary audience | Stanford News

Then be sure to bookmark the actual Sourcebook itself located here: Global Medieval Sourcebook.

Thank you Stanford University for developing such a wonderful Repository!

Universities Ditch Books for Digitization | theTrumpet.com

Controversy erupted at the University of California–Santa Cruz when 60 percent of its printed materials were removed from the Science & Engineering Library. Faculty members were outraged that approximately 80,000 books valued between $2-$6 million were hauled off campus or destroyed without their consultation. A proposal to remove 90 percent of written material from the Cabot Science Library at Harvard was scaled back by the faculty there.

The more I think about this story, the angrier I become.

It’s not the fact that the schools are going “digital” – that’s fine if their students are happy with that decision and I understand how much easier it probably is to manage their inventory & to provide open spaces in the library for the students.

No, what has me upset is that in some cases these “schools” are DESTROYING printed books when they make the transfer to digital.  How could they do this?

I cover stories on a weekly basis of schools desperately reaching out for book donations, of schools trying to find money in their budgets to add to a sub-par library.  Why would they do this when there are so many other options available?  Donate the unwanted tomes, hell – even sell them if you want some type of payoff for disposing of them.  But to just out-and-out destroy them?!

Shame.  Shame on you.  Shame on you for destroying the books, shame of you for apparently not even considering other options but most of all – shame on you for calling yourself a “school” or “educator”.  You are not worried about “educating” people, at least not as much as you are worried about making a profit.

I just find this all so very, very sad.

Source: Universities Ditch Books for Digitization | theTrumpet.com