The Only 3 Full-Frame Lenses You Need for Travel Photography

For the photographers whose studio extends far beyond the four walls, and for jetsetters and road warriors who are called to a life of travel photography, full-frame lenses are key. Any photographer loves new glass and photography is like any passion or hobby — there are so many amazing, shiny tools that can get a job done.

But when you’re traveling, it’s not just about performance, but also weight, versatility, and durability. You can’t just pack up everything including the kitchen sink. You have to choose your tools wisely and shoot simply while on the road. So here is a list of the top travel lenses for photographers ready to capture and photograph the world.

But before I go into discussing the list, I want to give a quick tip that I’ve learned over the years when I travel: unless your job requires it, leave the prime lenses at home. While there are some fantastic options out there, especially for portrait photography, prime lenses lack the versatility and range of a zoom lens. Every trip I’ve gone on, I’ve always brought a prime, and every time, it’s gone unused because I have more reliable, versatile lenses I grab first. Save yourself the extra weight and skip the prime lenses for job on the road.

Continue @ Adorama

Ernest Hemingway story from 1956 published for first time

The themes and trappings are familiar for an Ernest Hemingway narrative: Paris, wartime, talk of books and wine and the scars of battle.

But the story itself has been little known beyond the scholarly community for decades: A Room on the Garden Side, written in 1956, is being published for the first time. The brief, Second World War-era fiction appears this week in the summer edition of The Strand Magazine, a literary quarterly which has released obscure works by Raymond Chandler, John Steinbeck and others.

Continue @ CBC.ca

Teacher restores over 1000 ancient books in 13-year career

#CHINA-HEBEI-ANCIENT BOOK RESTORATION (CN)

Photo taken on Aug. 2, 2018 shows some of the tools used for ancient book restoration in Shijiazhuang, capital of north China’s Hebei Province. Gao Huiyun is a teacher of cultural relics restoration and protection at Hebei Vocational Art College. Gao has restored over 1,000 ancient books in her 13-year career time. (Xinhua/Chen Qibao)

Continue @ Xinhua

How Book Vending Machines Can Help Those Living In America’s Book Deserts

Low-income neighborhoods in major cities across America have book deserts — a limited access to children’s books negatively impacts children’s vocabulary and reading comprehension. Book vending machines, installed in high-trafficked areas within these book deserts by NYC’s JetBlue airline, might be able to combat the problem.

In 2016, NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development led a study in partnership with JetBlue. The results shed a light on the lack of children’s books in low-income neighborhoods across the three major cities of Detroit, Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles. Those living in concentrated poverty, the study holds, have a much more limited access to print: They live in book deserts. The socioeconomic inequalities can be stark and they come at a cost, given that reading books as a child can have an out-sized impact on someone’s reading skills across the rest of their life.

Continue @ Forbes

Operation Paperback: Sending books to those who serve

Sandy Marron of Heritage Harbour collects books for soldiers.

Operation Paperback, a non-profit founded in 1999, sends shipments of books to military bases all over the world. Marron is one of 19,000 volunteers under the Operation Paperback umbrella.

The books go to military families, veterans, hospitals and bases overseas. The books help soldiers learn, pass the time or, on deployment, read to their children via webcam. Romance and religious books aren’t accepted.

Continue @ Bay Weekly

Why Fitness Is The New Hot Marketing Platform And Revenue Stream For Music

Earlier this month, Michael Simon, President and CEO of rights management company Harry Fox Agency (HFA), was taking an on-demand indoor cycling class with Peloton when the instructor started playing a song that Simon had never heard before, by a band he hadn’t had the chance to explore in greater depth.

The song was “Gettin’ Tighter” by iconic hard-rock band Deep Purple, from their 1975 album Come Taste the Band—the perfect addition to a ‘70s rock-themed workout.

Continue @ Forbes

3 ways that Stevie Wonder has changed the music industry

Excellent article on facts I’m sure many of us didn’t know about Mr. Wonder.  He changed some really important things for the industry.

Stevie Wonder performs at BottleRock Napa Valley Music Festival at Napa Valley Expo on Friday, May 27, 2016, in Napa, Calif. (Photo by Amy Harris/Invision/AP)

His music has changed music.

Sure, we all know Stevie Wonder’s iconic songbook — we could reach our word count here solely by reeling off standards such as “Higher Ground,” “Superstition” “Sir Duke” and many more. But as he hits town for an extended engagement at the Park Theater, let’s examine how Stevie Wonder has impacted the music industry itself.

Continue @ Las Vegas Review-Journal

Music as a gateway to shared humanity

MIT professor of electrical engineering and computer science Dina Katabi (far left) gives a tour of her lab to A.R. Rahman (center) and Anantha Chandrakasan (right), dean of the School of Engineering.

When A. R. Rahman, two-time Academy Award winner, singer-songwriter, and music producer from India, came to visit and take a course at MIT in July, he was in his element during a tour of interactive music systems on campus.

Anantha Chandrakasan, dean of the School of Engineering, led Rahman and his group to Building 24 where the small group of mostly non-musicians jammed together using their smartphones to sound off as brass, clarinet, percussion, or strings.

Continue @ MIT News