Photography: A Dying Art Form That’s Getting More Popular | HuffPost UK

Remember the days when collages of photos chaotically strewn across bedroom walls were a common fixture in teenage bedrooms? And that sense of excitement of taking a long-lost film into Boots, wondering what snaps were lurking in the dark room, debating internally at the checkout whether or not they’d be worth a few extra pounds for same day delivery? And lest not forget the disappointments… opening a package, only to find out that half of the photographs were overexposed, out of focus, or worst of all, obscured by the dreaded thumb. Those were the days!

Full Story:  Photography: A Dying Art Form That’s Getting More Popular | HuffPost UK

Eight photography podcasts you should be listening to now – Australian Photography

Photography podcasts are perfect for those long boring commutes or hard days stuck in the office as you try to drown out your workmate unloading into the phone on the desk opposite.

There are literally hundreds to choose from, covering topics from how to start a photography business to gear reviews, to photography news, and onto profiles of great photographers past and present.

So in no particular order, here are some of our favourite photography podcasts.

Source: Eight photography podcasts you should be listening to now – Australian Photography

Documenting a solar eclipse, 1918 style

A lot was happening in the spring of 1918. The United States was entering its second year of World War I. The hellish Spanish Flu pandemic, the deadliest health crisis in U.S. history, was sweeping through the country. And nature picked that moment for the first major cross-continental eclipse since 1865 (though smaller ones in 1878 and 1900 were less impressive).

It was just as big a deal in 1918 as it is in 2017. Its path was extremely close to that of next week’s eclipse. Daytime darkness arrived from the Pacific on Saturday afternoon June 8. It buzzed a tiny corner of Washington State and slid all the way down to Florida.

Full Story: Documenting a solar eclipse, 1918 style

Lonely Planet’s Trips app is Instagram for travel junkies

If you’ve ever planned a vacation abroad, you’ve probably spent some time with Lonely Planet. The company is the largest travel book publisher in the world and offers plenty of free resources on its website and in the Lonely Planet Guides app. The latter provided the inspiration for the latest Lonely Planet project, a new iPhone app called Trips (also coming to Android this fall). At its core, it’s a crowdsourced version of the Guides app. But instead of featuring contributions from Lonely Planet experts an

Full Story:   Lonely Planet’s Trips app is Instagram for travel junkies

How to Photograph the 2017 Solar Eclipse: Tips, What to Buy | Time.com

Americans will look skyward on Aug. 21 to witness a total solar eclipse that will cross the U.S. from coast to coast — and many will aim to photograph the eclipse to preserve the rare celestial phenomenon. During the total eclipse, the moon will block out the sun, momentarily engulfing parts of 14 states in darkness. Those who do not see a total solar eclipse will still see a partial eclipse, in which the moon blocks some of the sun’s light. Either occurrence presents a dramatic opportunity for sky gazers to capture the eclipse through photography.

Full Story:   How to Photograph the 2017 Solar Eclipse: Tips, What to Buy | Time.com

1901 camera technology works fine for modern motorsports photography | Autoweek

Inspired as well by old family photos of cars shot on a Brownie, I picked up a 1926 Brownie No. 2 Model F for cheap on eBay. The Model F was the first Brownie to have an aluminum case instead of a cardboard one, but it retained the No. 2’s original 1901-technology rotary shutter and three-stop aperture control. It shoots 120 film, still readily available today and easily processed. I brought my Brownie to the Arse Sweat-a-Palooza 24 Hours of Lemons race, where I was working as an official, and shot a few 8-exposure rolls of film with it. The results, as seen in the gallery above, were quite good for 116-year-old technology (granted, modern film is much more sensitive than the stuff used in the old days).

First camera I ever used was my grandfather’s Brownie 🙂

Full Story:  1901 camera technology works fine for modern motorsports photography | Autoweek

Crimea and the birth of war photography (From HeraldScotland)

IT was the conflict that brought Florence Nightingale to prominence, had a profound influence on Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy and was responsible for one of the greatest blunders in British military history, the Charge of the Light Brigade. But the Crimean War, which lasted from 1853-56 and claimed more than 750,000 lives, also gave birth to war photography, and it is the power of the images produced by English pioneer Roger Fenton that inspired a new exhibition at the Queen’s Gallery in the Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh.

Full Story:   Crimea and the birth of war photography (From HeraldScotland)

Photographer Carol Highsmith’s work for Library of Congress is her calling | Life | greensboro.com

“I love all of it,” she said. “Big-city neighborhoods, teeny-tiny towns, our national parks, quirky roadside attractions, Route 66, Old U.S. Route 11 from Canada to New Orleans, Lincoln Highway, the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean beaches, the Great Lakes, state parks. … I consider myself the luckiest person on Earth to travel our country eight months of the year.”

Full Story:  Photographer Carol Highsmith’s work for Library of Congress is her calling | Life | greensboro.com

The Normals: Fantastically absurd photography series celebrates eccentricity | Creative Boom

By definition, most people are “normal”. Some want to be different and follow the norms of a specific social or cultural tribe. They are normal too. And there are those who would laugh at such nonsensical categorisations, who don’t believe in or live by conventions, who create their own reality and live it naturally.

They are the subject of Pol Kurucz’s last photo series, “genuine eccentrics, weirdos and lunatics who in the eyes of the photographer are the new Normals”.

More photos:  The Normals: Fantastically absurd photography series celebrates eccentricity | Creative Boom