Use your words – (Re)introducing news poetry | The Colorado Independent

This is a cool idea!  Colorado poets, – read up 🙂

Send your stuff to newspoetry@coloradoindependent.com.

A few guidelines and clarifications…

– We’re looking for poems about issues that are of particular interest in Colorado.

– We’re partial to free form.

– Less is more.

– We won’t publish all submissions because we’re picky. Picky how? Suffice it to say that we know a good news poem when we see one.

– And, no, news poetry isn’t fake news.Use your words, Colorado. We can’t wait to read you.

Read details here: Use your words – (Re)introducing news poetry | The Colorado Independent

How Harry Potter changed the world

Twenty years ago, on June 26, 1997, a small children’s press in the UK took a chance on a work of children’s fiction by a debut author — an unknown single mom who’d first gotten the idea for her story while stuck on a train seven years earlier.

That author was J.K. Rowling. And her book, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone — published in the US a year later as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone — would go on to change the world.

Read article at Vox:  How Harry Potter changed the world – Vox

Chicago Remembers Gwendolyn Brooks, the first African-American to win a Pulitzer 

Chicago’s front yards, pool halls, bungalows and back alleys were the poetic landscapes in Gwendolyn Brooks’ words. She wrote about the people she passed on the streets or in grocery stores, colloquial experiences like the elderly couples eating beans off chipped dinnerware. Through her poetry, Brooks offered a precise and compassionate look into life in the city’s South Side.

Read story at:  Chicago Remembers Gwendolyn Brooks, the first African-American to win a Pulitzer | America Magazine

Twenty years on from the first book, Harry Potter continues to cast a spell on readers

Though Hogwarts is clearly a fantastic and fictional setting, the characters experience real life trials and traumas – bereavement, loneliness, persecution, jealousy, unrequited love, guilt, and bullying, to name but a few.

There are also the “stock” characters common to everyone’s school days – the class bully and his goons, the “insufferable know-it-all”, the school jokers, and the sadistic teacher.

Part of the appeal and achievement of the series, though, is the way these characters develop in complexity as Rowling’s readers grow and mature. So that assumptions made about characters upon first reading are challenged and tested by the events and revelations of the later books.

Read full article here: Twenty years on from the first book, Harry Potter continues to cast a spell on readers

Banned books used to recreate the Parthenon in Kassel | Daily Mail Online

It’s a replica of Greek temple the Parthenon, but instead of marble this installation is made from 100,000 banned books.

The creation, called ‘The Parthenon of Books’, is the centre piece of this year’s Documenta 14 exhibition in German city Kassel.

Created by conceptual artist Marta Minujín, its aim is to stir debate around censorship.It has also been installed at the same site where Nazis burned books by Jewish or Marxist writers in 1933. The 170 titles that form the building include the Bible, Salman Rushdie’s The Satanic Verses and Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.

This is absolutely amazing!!!  I’d love to be able to see this in person.

Read full story here: Banned books used to recreate the Parthenon in Kassel | Daily Mail Online

4 poets you need to read, from new poet laureate Tracy K. Smith | PBS NewsHour

Last week, the Library of Congress selected Tracy K. Smith as the new poet laureate. In a conversation with NewsHour correspondent Jeffrey Brown, Smith said the position was a chance for her to “profess publicly all that I really hold true privately — that if we can listen actively enough, if we can put enough pressure on ourselves and our thought processes, language can be a real tool of revelation.”

Read the story at NPR: 4 poets you need to read, from new poet laureate Tracy K. Smith | PBS NewsHour

Emma Watson hides 100 copies of Handmaid’s Tale across Paris | Metro News

The actress and bookworm, 27, runs her own bookclub, Our Shared Self, and yesterday announced that she would be hiding copies of The Handmaid’s Tale at various iconic locations in the French capital.

The book hunt – which saw fans of both the actress and literature alike flood the streets of the city in search of copies – was set in order to find the classic novel, adorned with Watson’s green book club ribbon.

Read at:  Emma Watson hides 100 copies of Handmaid’s Tale across Paris | Metro News

Warren Zevon’s Massive Book Collection Is for Sale

The late singer Warren Zevon was not just a revered songwriter; he was also a prolific bibliophile. Over his lifetime, the “Werewolves of London” singer amassed a collection of books numbering in the thousands. Now, nearly 14 years after his death at age 56 in September 2003, Zevon’s entire library is for sale. For the time being, though, fans looking for a literary piece of Zevon ephemera will have to travel. Unless they live in Vermont.

Zevon’s collection rests in the care of his ex-wife, Crystal Zevon, and their daughter, Ariel Zevon, at Brookview R&R in West Barnet. Select titles are available on eBay, and the rest are being catalogued for online sale, but for the moment, anyone wishing to peruse Zevon’s voluminous stacks will have to trek to a barn in the Caledonia County hamlet. It’s worth the trip.

Read article here.

Migrant women story contest seeks to raise awareness

A writing contest seeks to highlight the realities of migrant Mexican and foreign migrant women and raise awareness of the conditions, problems and successes they experience.

The contest — “Migrant woman, tell me your story 2017” — also encourages participation by asking women how they would solve specific problems they have encountered.The government of Mexico is sponsoring the contest through its National Institute for Women (Inmujeres), the National Migration Institute and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Participants must be 18 or older.

Read at:  Migrant women story contest seeks to raise awareness | Literature | yakimaherald.com