Highlighting the unseen artists behind comic books

Rob Stull says black comic book artists have always been in the industry, they just haven’t gotten the visibility they deserve.

Growing up in Brookline as a comic book geek, Rob Stull devoured iconic titles like Spider-Man, Captain America, Iron Man, and Batman.

As an African-American, he was especially enthralled by Black Panther and X-Men’s Storm, as well as other characters of color in Green Lantern. Stull assumed — correctly, of course — that even these superheroes of color were mostly created by white men like Marvel’s Stan Lee.

Continue @ The Boston Globe

Prisoners art exhibit examines creativity as a way to connect

Los Gatos United Methodist Church wants visitors to see humanity in everyone. At its “Open the Door! Art from Within” exhibit, prisoners currently incarcerated in Santa Clara Correctional Facilities are showing off their artwork until the end of the month.

The program originally began as a workshop for the inmates to connect with a spiritual journey.

“One of the women asked me ‘Who will see this artwork?’ but what she meant was ‘Who will see us?’” said Elaine Bondonno, the program director. “because they feel invisible to society when they’re behind the bars.”

Continue @ The Mercury News

How Fragmentation Is Hurting The Music Industry’s Developing Artists

The music industry has been in a rut for years — a $7 billion rut, to be exact. After a $15 billion peak in 1999, the industry watched its revenue slide until it plateaued at $7 billion in 2010, where it hovered for years. In 2016, the music industry finally saw an increase, notching a $7.65 billion year.

Streaming was credited for the turnaround, but the threat isn’t over. There’s a silent killer in the music industry that’s having a sinister impact on up-and-coming artists: fragmentation. Independent musicians work with so many different service providers that the ultimate outcome of all their efforts is confusion — and an uphill battle.

Continue @ Forbes

Kids Don’t Just See Art at This Show. They Work With the Artists, Too.

A young girl with waist-length golden hair entered a small room where a woman sat at a spinning wheel. Fascinated, the girl approached the device swiftly. Although the scene was in a modern museum, it had the feel of a fairy tale. A powerful spell had indeed been cast, and it was working: Amelia Salenger, the 4-year-old visitor, was becoming enchanted by contemporary art.

“Have you ever heard the story of Rumpelstiltskin?” the weaver, Deborah L. Morris, asked the child. “Do you want to see how this works?”

Read @ New York Times

17 Best (And 13 Worst) Unused Star Wars Concept Art That Would’ve Changed Everything

The artists behind Star Wars are some of the best in the movie industry. The talented art departments at Industrial Light and Magic and Lucasfilm are responsible for some of the most iconic visuals in cinema history, and their creativity continues to raise the bar. Their work in Star Wars has helped make the franchise what it is today, and even when a film is finished, tons of unused content can still be leftover.

Their concept art can be pretty revealing; highlighting designs that were changed, ideas that were dropped, and movie-moments that never came to be. Sometimes these changes are for the better, but sometimes the concept art shows us something even cooler than we got.

For this list, we’ll be taking a look at some of the best and worst Star Wars concept art to see just how many great ideas (or bad ones) were left on the drawing board.

Read @ Screen Rant