An Invaluable, Incomplete Show of Black Southern Art at the Met

Visitors to the Metropolitan Museum of Art have long had access to “the panoramic view of human history” that King described in his speech, from the ancient-Egyptian Temple of Dendur to the Renaissance gems in the Lehman Collection and the Depression-era mural panel of cotton pickers, by Thomas Hart Benton. But, until the museum accepted a gift from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation, in 2014, it had turned a blind eye to the black artists, born during Jim Crow, making magnificent work across the Deep South. The driving force behind the foundation is the white collector William Arnett (he was the subject of a Profile in The New Yorker, in 2013, when the donation was still being negotiated). Arnett’s collection numbers in the thousands, and is now being dispersed to museums around the country. But the Met was given first dibs, and it chose fifty-seven pieces, by thirty artists. An exhibition was planned for 2016, but it has been delayed until now.

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Cambridge University moves to ‘decolonise’ English literature curriculum | London Evening Standard

I think it’s rather appalling that it takes a “movement” to have these writers included, I would have thought they were long ago.  Great writing is great writing – no matter the ethnicity / religion of the author.  Still, I’m glad to see the change is finally happening.

Students have campaigned to 'decolonise' the university

The University of Cambridge’s English faculty is taking steps to “decolonise” the curriculum in response to a student campaign.

Full Story: Cambridge University moves to ‘decolonise’ English literature curriculum | London Evening Standard