‘Memory books’ can help older loved ones recall their past

'Memory books' can help older loved ones recall their past

Family photo albums can help jog an elderly friend or relative’s memories, but consider taking the photo book idea one step further: Create a “memory book” that combines personal photos with brief family stories and historical information.

These can be used to help people struggling with memory loss, and give younger family members a window into older relatives’ lives.

Memory books are also useful in helping older people introduce themselves to caregivers and provide topics for conversation, says Ann Norwich, director of the adult gerontology nurse practitioner program at York College of Pennsylvania.

By illustrating and explaining details from the person’s past, Norwich says, the books cue caregivers and other visitors to ask better questions. That can prolong positive conversation.

Read full article and learn how to begin at: Coeur d’Alene Press

This Beloved Street Photography Bible Gets an Exciting New Edition – Flavorwire

Street photography didn’t start with Henri Cartier-Bresson. Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre, Charles Nègre, and other predecessors were capturing the comings and goings on the Boulevard du Temple in Paris and beyond in the 19th century. A detailed history of street photography was first collected in a 1994 landmark book called Bystander, by artist Joel Meyerowitz and curator Colin Westerbeck; Laurence King Publishing is releasing a newly revised edition (available November 7), featuring 27 additional photographers, a new chapter devoted to digital photography, and a historical revisit. From the publisher’s press release:

Full Story: This Beloved Street Photography Bible Gets an Exciting New Edition – Flavorwire

Illustrating a better world: ‘Malala’s Magic Pencil’ invokes youth voices

What if you had a magic pencil with the power to create anything you wanted? What would you draw? What would you erase?

As a child Malala Yousafzai, the youngest Nobel Prize Laureate, dreamed for such a pencil, one to draw a real soccer ball for her brothers or beautiful dresses for her mother. One to draw a more peaceful world, an equal place for boys and girls.

Full Story: Illustrating a better world: ‘Malala’s Magic Pencil’ invokes youth voices

Prince’s personal photographer releases new book of rare images – StarTribune.com

Parke got the gig. And he kept on painting — staying on as art director and Prince’s personal photographer for 14 years.Parke did everything from designing stage sets and working on video shoots to photographing album covers and designing souvenir T-shirts. And he continued to live in Baltimore, spending about one week a month in Chanhassen.

Full story & Gallery at: Prince’s personal photographer releases new book of rare images – StarTribune.com

Harry Potter Kindle In Motion books feature magical MOVING pictures: WATCH this preview

This is my favorite story of the day so far! I love the thought of this – moving picture in e-books, some of them interactive! How cool is that? Imagine what you can do with children’s and Young Adult literature. I hope this really catches on and it’s no surprise that J.K. Rowling’s “Harry Potter” would be the story to bring this forward to the masses. Can’t wait to get my copy!

Full article about the new Kindle versions available at Express UK

Four book series that are shaping the future of science fiction on television | Ars Technica

Looks like television is going to just keep getting better and better!

If recent Hollywood deals are any indication, science fiction on TV is about to get even more interesting and complex. The trend started with the surprising announcement in late 2016 that Lin Manuel-Miranda’s next project—after completing his run on Hamilton and writing the music for Moana—would be to adapt Patrick Rothfuss’ cult fantasy series The Kingkiller Chronicle for TV and film. Just in the past two months, three more gamechanging options were announced: HBO will adapt Nnedi Okorafor’s Who Fears Deat

Full Story: Four book series that are shaping the future of science fiction on television | Ars Technica