Feel the burn! See the cameras and lenses that got torched by the Solar Eclipse – Australian Photography

Uh-oh Some of you weren’t listening to all that good advice about photographing the solar eclipse 🙂

A couple of weeks back, in the lead-up to the Northern Hemisphere Solar Eclipse, we shared a story about the dangers of directly photographing the sun with a digital camera.

Clearly, the warning went unheeded by at least a few photographers as you can see from the images published below.

Full  Story & More Photos at: Feel the burn! See the cameras and lenses that got torched by the Solar Eclipse – Australian Photography

The A to Z of Photography: Exposure compensation | TechRadar

The exposure compensation control on your camera will either take the form of a dedicated dial or, in some instances, be tucked away in your camera’s menu – it’ll be marked with a +/- icon. It’s worth familiarising yourself with this setting, as exposure compensation gives you a great deal of flexibility in fine-tuning your exposure.

Full Story at: The A to Z of Photography: Exposure compensation | TechRadar

1901 camera technology works fine for modern motorsports photography | Autoweek

Inspired as well by old family photos of cars shot on a Brownie, I picked up a 1926 Brownie No. 2 Model F for cheap on eBay. The Model F was the first Brownie to have an aluminum case instead of a cardboard one, but it retained the No. 2’s original 1901-technology rotary shutter and three-stop aperture control. It shoots 120 film, still readily available today and easily processed. I brought my Brownie to the Arse Sweat-a-Palooza 24 Hours of Lemons race, where I was working as an official, and shot a few 8-exposure rolls of film with it. The results, as seen in the gallery above, were quite good for 116-year-old technology (granted, modern film is much more sensitive than the stuff used in the old days).

First camera I ever used was my grandfather’s Brownie 🙂

Full Story:  1901 camera technology works fine for modern motorsports photography | Autoweek

The Polaroid Project is a Snapshot of Artistic Invention

I miss the days of Polaroid.  I remember my grandfather snapping a pic and watching his watch, trying to get me to be patient, waiting for just the right moment to pull the photo free and for all of us to see the miracle of “instant” memories preserved.

Before the iPhone and Steve Jobs, there was Polaroid and Edwin H. Land. The Polaroid Project: At the Intersection of Art and Technology, now on view at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, chronicles Land’s revolutionary development of instantaneous photography and explores artists’ use of Polaroid’s technology to create unexpected works.

Full Story:  The Polaroid Project is a Snapshot of Artistic Invention | NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Manual smartphone photography: here’s what those terms mean [Tech Savvy SA]

It seems like years since smartphones usurped dedicated cameras to become the most popular way to take photos. That’s not to say that dedicated cameras are obsolete (not at all), but more and more people find their phone camera to do the job well enough. Smartphone camera apps are generally easy to understand, with auto modes going a long way to help. But what if you’d like to dabble with your phone’s pro mode? Here’s what all those settings do…

Continue here: Manual smartphone photography: here’s what those terms mean [Tech Savvy SA]

Dual-cameras: The next big thing in smartphone photography – Dual Cameras

Today dual-cameras are making a return. A large variety of smartphone makers are now using this system to take smartphone camera capabilities to the next level. Apart from using HTC M8 Eye mechanism to imitate a low depth of field, we now have dual-cameras that offer separate focal length for wider or zoomed-in pictures, while others are using RGB and monochrome sensors. Lets see them one by one.

Read full story here:  Dual-cameras: The next big thing in smartphone photography – Dual Cameras