How Book Vending Machines Can Help Those Living In America’s Book Deserts

Low-income neighborhoods in major cities across America have book deserts — a limited access to children’s books negatively impacts children’s vocabulary and reading comprehension. Book vending machines, installed in high-trafficked areas within these book deserts by NYC’s JetBlue airline, might be able to combat the problem.

In 2016, NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development led a study in partnership with JetBlue. The results shed a light on the lack of children’s books in low-income neighborhoods across the three major cities of Detroit, Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles. Those living in concentrated poverty, the study holds, have a much more limited access to print: They live in book deserts. The socioeconomic inequalities can be stark and they come at a cost, given that reading books as a child can have an out-sized impact on someone’s reading skills across the rest of their life.

Continue @ Forbes

First ever AR-powered novel to open Sprung ghosthunting series

Carlton is to publish its most expensively originated book on Super Thursday (4th October), an augmented reality (AR) novel for children. The Ghostkeeper’s Journal Field Guide, written and produced by Carlton’s digital director Japhet Asher (pictured), is an immersive adventure for readers aged 10 and up, priced at £14.99.

The book builds on Carlton’s AR range, with the publisher having sold more than four million copies of such titles around the world, including Jurassic World, Bugs and Alien, through retail or coedition partners. It also represents a change for the mainly non-fiction publisher—Asher said the title was the “first ever augmented reality powered novel”.

Continue @ The Bookseller-Jul 30, 2018

Geoff Johnson: How to turn our kids into lifelong readers

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At its best, reading is an intimate experience. It creates a direct conduit between the experiences and imaginations of the writer and the reader.

Patrick Hogan of the University of Connecticut and Keith Oatley of the University of Toronto are researchers who have studied the links between emotion and understanding.

Continue @ Times Colonist

NYC children and teens learn analog photography

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NEW YORK (FOX5NY.COM) – The International Center of Photography, or ICP, began collaborating with THE POINT, a community center in the Hunts Point section of the Bronx more than 20 years ago.

THE POINT executive managing director Daney Peralta called it the Super Bowl of photography.

In a snapshot, the night is a celebration of art and finding a voice. Each day, preteen and teen students learn photography and darkroom skills. But along their journey, they also learn about themselves.

Continue @ Fox5NY

Sam Hinton’s illustrations of happy characters look on the bright side of life

Prominently on show at this year’s D&AD New Blood festival, on one of the many stands, we spotted the work of Sam Hinton, an illustrator and recent graduate of Falmouth University. “Since my time at school I’ve always taken my passion for drawing seriously,” he says. “Spending years filling sketchbooks I continue to explore the weird and surreal nature of my imagination.”

And weird and wonderful it really is. With a lightness and positivity resonant throughout, Sam uses a bright and colourful palette to create illustrations full of happy characters, going about their daily business. Speaking to Sam about the various pieces we’ve shared with you here, it’s clear Sam’s own character is reflected in his work. For example, for one of his illustrations, he said: “I felt inspired to create a piece that captured the rolling countryside and the warm sunset glow I often experienced whilst studying at Falmouth University. The true beauty that’s on our doorstep.”

Continue @ Creative Boom (blog)

Area foster children get books, backpacks through Books for Youth program

Books for Kids

Most of the children running around the front lawn of Haynes International on Tuesday were just excited to see Blue, the famed Indianapolis Colts mascot. The gift they were going to receive will last longer than that initial excitement, however.

Sixty-one foster kids and their families from the Kokomo community gathered at the grounds of one of the city’s leading manufacturers for the 7th annual Books for Youth program. The event, presented by Cargo Services Inc., the Indiana Department of Child Services, the Indianapolis Colts and Haynes International, is held every year to equip foster children with a Colts backpack filled with 25 age-appropriate books.

Continue @ Kokomo Tribune

10 innovations in children’s books that kids care about

We ran some data on our 30,000 reviews recently and there were some shocking results.

Actually, I’m kidding; there was absolutely nothing shocking. At least, not for anyone familiar with the industry. 90% of our adult reviewers are female (I love how, when I’m presenting this data to publishers, it’s often to a room where the audience is 100% female). And rather reassuringly, 20% of our readers had chosen to read that book because of its cover. Its cover. Not some fancy gizmo. Not because of the format. The good old fashioned, been around for hundreds of years, cover.

BOOM.

And yet, as an industry, there always seems to be a drive to innovate. That we’re continually waiting for the death of the book as we know it, and some exciting new thing, which is going to blow everything out of the water.

Continue @ The Bookseller

Michael Bublé Says He Almost Quit Music After Son Noah Was Diagnosed With Cancer

I normally avoid the so-called “celebrity” stories, but I loved a couple of the quotes from Michael in this interview.  I’m very happy to hear that his son seems to be recovering so well.  Such good news.

“I truly thought I’d never come back to music,” he told the newspaper. “Family is what matters. The health of my children is number one. The relationship with my family, my wife, my faith — all of it is easily number one.”

“I remember sitting in the hospital room thinking ‘I was worried about any of that s***?” he said. “I was worried about record sales or a meme or what some a**hole said about me?”

“In a second it had gotten so clear,” he continued. “That clarity gave me the opportunity to find love (for music) again. I’m going to go back to what I was made to do. I’m going to come back to a world that needs love and romance and laughter more than it has in a long time. I’m going to be a conduit to that.”

Read the full article @ Entertainment Tonight