Chef Marcus Samuelsson Shows You The Richness Of Culinary Travel

Culinary travel has definitely been on the rise in recent years—according to research compiled by the website Booking.com, 51% of U.S. travelers select a destination for its culinary offerings and 25% plan to take a dedicated culinary trip this year, many to New York, the top pick for a food destination. So it made sense for the site to join forces with chef Marcus Samuelsson, owner of Red Rooster Harlem among others, and star of the current PBS series “No Passport Required” currently airing on PBS stations and streaming on Eater.com to launch a culinary recommendations section called “A Taste of Travel.” Samuelsson will list his restaurant picks for four cities: New York, New Orleans, Myrtle Beach and San Francisco.

For the series, Samuelsson traveled to six U.S. cities on a discovery tour but the restaurants weren’t necessarily the focus; he was after the immigrant culture expressed through their food scene. In New York, he explored the Indo-Guyanese community in the borough of Queens, in Miami, the Haitian community, in New Orleans, Vietnamese, in the Detroit area, the Arab community, the Mexican community in Chicago and in Washington D.C., the culture of the country of his birth, Ethiopia.

Continue @ Forbes

Where to travel for your summer food favorites

The Point Crab House and Grill in Arnold,

As locavores preach, food tastes better when eaten as close as possible to its place of origin. Fried clams are guaranteed to be fresh in Ipswich. Blue crabs taste sweetest on the Chesapeake Bay. Plan a summer weekend trip to one of the following destinations to enjoy the local culinary specialty along with the scenery.

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This $1500 ice cream is the most expensive in America — here’s what you get

This $1,500 ice cream is the most expensive in America

People love their ice cream — the average American eats about 23 pounds of ice cream every year, in fact.

But there’s one ice cream sundae found in New York City that’s far from typical. The “Bear Extraordinaire,” which debuted Wednesday at Baccarat Hotel New York in Manhattan, is the country’s most expensive sundae, and it will set you back a cool $1,500.

Continue @ CNBC

Moveable Feasts: The Growing World of Culinary Travel

Red wine with pizza on cutting board

One of today’s most powerful niches is culinary travel—whether that involves a food-related activity or two, or a longer trip focused entirely on food and wine. Given its ever-growing popularity, culinary travel shouldn’t be hard to sell, but agents still need to know the best way to break into the niche.

“Many agents are finding success by partnering with local restaurants and wineries that keep a database of client information,” said Debby Hughes of Distinct Journeys in Loveland, Ohio. “Chefs or sommeliers are often great Pied Pipers, and cruise nights at their locations can stimulate interest and bookings. Many cruise lines can arrange onboard wine tastings, pairings and cooking classes to be led by the chef or sommelier.”

Continue @ TravelPulse

Hot Plates: Documentary about women in the restaurant business — ‘we need to get a little louder’

Although more than half of culinary school graduates are women, fewer than 7 percent of restaurant owners and head chefs are female, according to a Bloomberg News statistic James cites. And when Time magazine ran a story earlier this decade lauding “Gods of the Kitchen,” a roundup of top culinary talent that exclusively featured men, James, a former newspaper reporter who worked at her mother’s restaurant growing up, found the enraging inspiration for her first documentary film.

Read @ SouthFlorida.com