Eighty Years Later, Two Exhibits Confront the “Degenerate Art” Purge | Smart News | Smithsonian

On July 18, 1937, the Nazis put on what was to become an annual art show—the “Great German Art Exhibition,” in Munich’s Haus der Kunst. The images on display included classical and pastoral images, realistic portraits and still lifes, nudes, landscapes and images out of German mythology. The following day, a companion exhibition opened nearby. Called the “Degenerate Art” exhibition (“Entartete Kunst”), it was a collection of more than 650 paintings and artworks confiscated from German museums representing Impressionism, Dadaism, Cubism, Surrealism, Expressionism and all the “modern” movements that defined 20th-century art; everything, essentially, that the Nazis deemed dangerous to the “Thousand-Year Reich.”

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