Universities Ditch Books for Digitization | theTrumpet.com

Controversy erupted at the University of California–Santa Cruz when 60 percent of its printed materials were removed from the Science & Engineering Library. Faculty members were outraged that approximately 80,000 books valued between $2-$6 million were hauled off campus or destroyed without their consultation. A proposal to remove 90 percent of written material from the Cabot Science Library at Harvard was scaled back by the faculty there.

The more I think about this story, the angrier I become.

It’s not the fact that the schools are going “digital” – that’s fine if their students are happy with that decision and I understand how much easier it probably is to manage their inventory & to provide open spaces in the library for the students.

No, what has me upset is that in some cases these “schools” are DESTROYING printed books when they make the transfer to digital.  How could they do this?

I cover stories on a weekly basis of schools desperately reaching out for book donations, of schools trying to find money in their budgets to add to a sub-par library.  Why would they do this when there are so many other options available?  Donate the unwanted tomes, hell – even sell them if you want some type of payoff for disposing of them.  But to just out-and-out destroy them?!

Shame.  Shame on you.  Shame on you for destroying the books, shame of you for apparently not even considering other options but most of all – shame on you for calling yourself a “school” or “educator”.  You are not worried about “educating” people, at least not as much as you are worried about making a profit.

I just find this all so very, very sad.

Source: Universities Ditch Books for Digitization | theTrumpet.com

How Your Hotel Stay Will Evolve in 2017

I really love the idea of the “Curated Experience” and the various “Digital Apps” that allow a guest keyless entry into a room as well as a host of requests able to be made digitally.  But I don’t ever want to see these apps take the place of the human touch that is essential to delivering a great customer experience.

Example: If you a request a roll-away with your room but one is not available, do they apps talk to you about your other options? What if the Front Desk or GM is able to change your room type, often with no charge above the roll-away fee, to meet your needs? A human being can evaluate the situation and offer advice, guidance & upgrades to find a creative way to meet your needs. Most apps would simply follow an inventory database as to what is or is not available.

Besides, it’s so much nicer to have a smiling representative of the property greet you with a warm “Welcome” and “May I help you” then a cold (no matter the digital voice quality) computer to try to do the same.

Fine for simple requests, but I would never want to rely on technology to replace human interaction, it’s only worthwhile if it enhances that human experience.

An enviable location, superlative amenities and genuine hospitality have long been the hallmark traits of time-tested customer loyalty. While some leading hotel brands are luring guests with customized, tech-savvy apps, others are reinventing the guest experience with flexible, multipurpose spaces,

Source: How Your Hotel Stay Will Evolve in 2017