Dave Grohl Announces ‘Play’ Project Inspired By His Kids Discovering Music

Dave Grohl

Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl is continuing to explore the world of documentaries, announcing today a two-part mini doc titled “Play” which he directed. Ever the overachiever, Grohl also plays seven different instruments during the film and on a resulting 23-minute recording. In revealing the project, Grohl released a sketch of his set up (see it below).

“Play,” arriving on Aug. 10, is described as “celebrating the rewards and challenges of dedicating ones life to playing and mastering a musical instrument.” Grohl has long advocated for music education and the importance of learning to play an instrument. Part one is mostly narrated and offers a look at the music-making process.

Continue @ Variety

A Nigerian Photographer’s Portraits Of The Mind

Etinosa Yvonne Osayimwen’s goal is to get inside her subjects’ heads.

The self-trained, 28-year-old documentary photographer does just that by using a double-exposure technique. She takes portraits of Nigerian survivors of violence and terrorism — then superimposes it with an image of something that reminds them of how their lives have changed.

In one photo, for example, a construction plan is layered over the profile of a building engineer whose community was attacked by Boko Haram. Another image shows a woman’s profile covered in another photo of the same woman on crutches after she was shot in the leg.

In July, the Nigerian was awarded a grant by Women Photograph to pursue her project, “It’s All In My Head.”

Continue @ NPR

Why Photographer Dorothea Lange’s Political Legacy Continues to Endure

She is my first answer when people ask me who my favorite photographer is/was.  I would give almost anything to capture the emotion in the subject and instill the empathy in the viewer with photographs the way that she mastered.  Truly she was one of a kind.

6. Dorothea Lange in Texas on the Plains, ca. 1935

Who? It’s hard to imagine the landscape of modern documentary photography without the defiant, principled and tireless presence of Dorothea Lange. Born in New Jersey in 1895, Lange is today widely acknowledged as one of the most influential image-makers of her century, having relentlessly documented some of the most turbulent political and cultural times in American history: from the tired, hungry and desperate Dust Bowl refugees of the Great Depression, to the Japanese-American internees she felt were being unjustly incarcerated post-Pearl Harbor, through to the thousands of women who made up the workforce in the shipyards of Richmond during the Second World War.

A visual activist, proto-feminist, and early environmental campaigner, Lange triumphed over adversity in her young life after contracting polio at the age of seven – an illness that left her with a misshapen foot, causing her to walk with a limp for the rest of her life. This episode imbued in her a sense of empathy which she felt contributed to her ability to engage with her subjects. “Lange was a strong advocate for the power of photography to effect real change,” explains Alona Pardo, curator of the retrospective Dorothea Lange: The Politics of Seeing, newly opened at the Barbican. “She dedicated her life to telling the truthful stories of the communities she sought to represent and record.”

Read @ AnOther Magazine

Hot Plates: Documentary about women in the restaurant business — ‘we need to get a little louder’

Although more than half of culinary school graduates are women, fewer than 7 percent of restaurant owners and head chefs are female, according to a Bloomberg News statistic James cites. And when Time magazine ran a story earlier this decade lauding “Gods of the Kitchen,” a roundup of top culinary talent that exclusively featured men, James, a former newspaper reporter who worked at her mother’s restaurant growing up, found the enraging inspiration for her first documentary film.

Read @ SouthFlorida.com