Doctors should prescribe art and poetry classes to patients, MPs say | News & Star

Greater use of “arts-on-prescription” programmes could save the NHS money by improving patients’ mental or physical health, with evidence suggesting creative activities could lower GP consultation rates and hospital admissions.

The All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Arts, Health and Wellbeing said: “Arts-on-prescription activities help people to overcome physical and psychological pain, playing a vital role in the recovery and maintenance of health.

“Group creative activities in the community also help to overcome social isolation in people of all ages.”

Full Story: Doctors should prescribe art and poetry classes to patients, MPs say | News & Star

Sidelined by strokes, a Maple Ridge man discovers poetry – Maple Ridge News

When Barry Plamondon was released from the hospital in 2013 his left side was paralyzed.

His second stroke also left him in a wheelchair.

The 25-year Maple Ridge resident sat at home for a couple of months acclimatizing to his new reality.

But after the second month he realized that he needed to do something to come to terms with his new disabilities.Plamondon picked up a pen and started writing.

Source: Sidelined by strokes, a Maple Ridge man discovers poetry – Maple Ridge News

Art can be a powerful medicine against dementia | The Guardian

The more I hear evidence like this, the more I question why the homes & hospitals we Americans tend to put our Senior Citizens in, have bare walls and allow solitary lifestyles.  Activity rooms focus on mundane activities instead of creative pursuits.  Why is it we just don’t “get” this?  When will it change?  Healing & Wellness includes the betterment of the soul – and we all know ART is what feeds the soul.  Why are we starving our Seniors of this requirement?

A few weeks ago, turning on the radio, I hear a voice saying that creative writing can help wounds heal faster. Startled, I turn the volume up. Volunteers were given small wounds; half were then asked to write about something distressing in their life, the other half about something mundane. The wounds of the confessional writers healed substantially more quickly. A thought or a feeling is felt on the skin. Our minds, which have power over our bodies, are in our bodies and are our bodies: we cannot separate

Full Story:   Art can be a powerful medicine against dementia | Nicci Gerrard | Society | The Guardian

The 10 Worst Foods For Your Heart – Time Magazine

As the wife of a heart-attack survivor, I’m always trying to keep up with what the most recent science is regarding nutrition.  Suffice it to say, this is not easy as there are a million different opinions out there and most of them can cite this study or that personal experience as proof.  I try to stay pretty mainstream with what I follow, but it’s scary to wonder if you are doing the right thing or not.

However, that being said, most of what appears in this article regarding these ten foods seems to be pretty much agreed upon across the board.

If heart disease runs in your family, please stay on top of info like this.  It’s so important to watch what we consume and I personally think most of us often eat mindlessly and really don’t give enough credence to the effect simple nutrition has on our bodies.  My main advice that I now follow:  EAT REAL FOOD  I try to avoid any and all processed or convenience food.  But read this article & others like it for yourself, and please – treat your bodies well.  🙂

The top 10 foods listed in this article are:

  • Fast-food burgers
  • Processed and cured meats
  • Deep-fried foods
  • Candy
  • Soft drinks and sugar-sweetened juices
  • Sugary cereals
  • Cookies and pastries
  • Margarine
  • Meat-lovers pizza
  • Diet soda

But please, read the article & get the details – it’s not quite as cut-and-dry as listing the ten, you need to understand the nuances behind each one.

Full article from Time Magazine:  The 10 Worst Foods For Your Heart

‘Take Two Songs and Call Me in the Morning’: How Music Might Be Your Next Prescription Drug | Outside Online

In 2013, this question spurred Ketki Karanam, former head of product design at Nokia, biologist Marko Ahtisaari, and postdoc student Yadid Ayzenberg to lay the groundwork for the Sync Project, a Boston-based company whose main goal is to develop music as precision medicine. For the past two years, Sync has been spearheading various studies that look at the connection between music and the mind. The company has collaborated with advisers from Berklee College of Music, MIT Media Lab, and Spotify to gather dat

Source: ‘Take Two Songs and Call Me in the Morning’: How Music Might Be Your Next Prescription Drug | Outside Online