The Only 3 Full-Frame Lenses You Need for Travel Photography

For the photographers whose studio extends far beyond the four walls, and for jetsetters and road warriors who are called to a life of travel photography, full-frame lenses are key. Any photographer loves new glass and photography is like any passion or hobby — there are so many amazing, shiny tools that can get a job done.

But when you’re traveling, it’s not just about performance, but also weight, versatility, and durability. You can’t just pack up everything including the kitchen sink. You have to choose your tools wisely and shoot simply while on the road. So here is a list of the top travel lenses for photographers ready to capture and photograph the world.

But before I go into discussing the list, I want to give a quick tip that I’ve learned over the years when I travel: unless your job requires it, leave the prime lenses at home. While there are some fantastic options out there, especially for portrait photography, prime lenses lack the versatility and range of a zoom lens. Every trip I’ve gone on, I’ve always brought a prime, and every time, it’s gone unused because I have more reliable, versatile lenses I grab first. Save yourself the extra weight and skip the prime lenses for job on the road.

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Best Lenses for Food Photography

 

If you’re looking for the best lens for food photography, you’ve come to the right place. As with a few other photography niches where it’s crucial to capture images as they look in real life (or better), an important factor to consider when shooting food is the focal length of the lens and your camera’s sensor size.

Before you purchase lenses (or any camera equipment at all, if you’re just starting out) for food photography, know that sensor size matters big time. Therefore, many professionals will tell you that investing in a full-frame camera will prove to be advantageous for virtually every photographic need.

But even if you already own a camera with a cropped sensor, you should still consider purchasing lenses that are compatible with full-frame cameras so you can still use them once you upgrade your gear.

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Indy Music through the Lens

For local videographer Jake Huber, there’s no such thing as a lofty idea. From filming Hoops in a public-access television studio to filming Oreo Jones in a moving glass-box truck, the music videographer extraordinaire isn’t afraid to test the limits in order to help showcase local talent.

“It’s just fun to meet people,” Huber says. “If I have a crazy idea, most of the time, people will just say, ‘OK, go for it.’”

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