Appalachian Music Celebrates Modern Culture, Immigrant Past

“To me the difference between a violin, and a fiddle, is that a violin never had a beer spilled on it… That is the difference.”

Will Fanning laughs at his joke as he rocks on his chair outside his home in Mingo, West Virginia. Fanning is a musician and hotel owner born in Ireland. But now he lives deep in the Appalachian Mountains of the United States.

“The Irish nearly every day have a song and play music,” said Fanning. “So that tradition is kind of bred into me. My family, every weekend we’d play music at the house.”

Like Fanning, many in the area continue the traditions from their families’ immigrant history including a kind of music called old-time.

Continue @ Voice of America

10 musicians we bet you didn’t know are also photographers

10 musicians we bet you didn’t know are also photographers

Finding a new band is awesome. What’s more awesome is finding out the members of said band are multitalented outside of their own field. For as long the technology has been around, music and photography have gone together like peaches and cream. Whether they are freelancer photographers, snapping on the road or just looking for something fun to do at home, these musicians show us a different side of them from behind the lens.

Continue @ Alternative Press (blog)

Why Fitness Is The New Hot Marketing Platform And Revenue Stream For Music

Earlier this month, Michael Simon, President and CEO of rights management company Harry Fox Agency (HFA), was taking an on-demand indoor cycling class with Peloton when the instructor started playing a song that Simon had never heard before, by a band he hadn’t had the chance to explore in greater depth.

The song was “Gettin’ Tighter” by iconic hard-rock band Deep Purple, from their 1975 album Come Taste the Band—the perfect addition to a ‘70s rock-themed workout.

Continue @ Forbes

3 ways that Stevie Wonder has changed the music industry

Excellent article on facts I’m sure many of us didn’t know about Mr. Wonder.  He changed some really important things for the industry.

Stevie Wonder performs at BottleRock Napa Valley Music Festival at Napa Valley Expo on Friday, May 27, 2016, in Napa, Calif. (Photo by Amy Harris/Invision/AP)

His music has changed music.

Sure, we all know Stevie Wonder’s iconic songbook — we could reach our word count here solely by reeling off standards such as “Higher Ground,” “Superstition” “Sir Duke” and many more. But as he hits town for an extended engagement at the Park Theater, let’s examine how Stevie Wonder has impacted the music industry itself.

Continue @ Las Vegas Review-Journal

Music as a gateway to shared humanity

MIT professor of electrical engineering and computer science Dina Katabi (far left) gives a tour of her lab to A.R. Rahman (center) and Anantha Chandrakasan (right), dean of the School of Engineering.

When A. R. Rahman, two-time Academy Award winner, singer-songwriter, and music producer from India, came to visit and take a course at MIT in July, he was in his element during a tour of interactive music systems on campus.

Anantha Chandrakasan, dean of the School of Engineering, led Rahman and his group to Building 24 where the small group of mostly non-musicians jammed together using their smartphones to sound off as brass, clarinet, percussion, or strings.

Continue @ MIT News