Feel the burn! See the cameras and lenses that got torched by the Solar Eclipse – Australian Photography

Uh-oh Some of you weren’t listening to all that good advice about photographing the solar eclipse 🙂

A couple of weeks back, in the lead-up to the Northern Hemisphere Solar Eclipse, we shared a story about the dangers of directly photographing the sun with a digital camera.

Clearly, the warning went unheeded by at least a few photographers as you can see from the images published below.

Full  Story & More Photos at: Feel the burn! See the cameras and lenses that got torched by the Solar Eclipse – Australian Photography

Can’t see the solar eclipse? Tune in online or on TV – ABC News

Ronald Dantowitz has been looking forward to Monday’s solar eclipse for nearly 40 years.

An astronomer who specializes in solar imaging, he’s been photographing eclipses for more than three decades, and will be using 14 cameras to capture the Aug. 21 celestial event. The cameras have solar filters to capture the eclipse in its partial phases, along with custom modifications that can photograph the corona and light wavelengths that are invisible to the human eye, allowing scientists to view and study the sun’s temperature and composition in a way only possible during a total eclipse, he said.

Full Story: Can’t see the solar eclipse? Tune in online or on TV – ABC News

Documenting a solar eclipse, 1918 style

A lot was happening in the spring of 1918. The United States was entering its second year of World War I. The hellish Spanish Flu pandemic, the deadliest health crisis in U.S. history, was sweeping through the country. And nature picked that moment for the first major cross-continental eclipse since 1865 (though smaller ones in 1878 and 1900 were less impressive).

It was just as big a deal in 1918 as it is in 2017. Its path was extremely close to that of next week’s eclipse. Daytime darkness arrived from the Pacific on Saturday afternoon June 8. It buzzed a tiny corner of Washington State and slid all the way down to Florida.

Full Story: Documenting a solar eclipse, 1918 style

How to Photograph the 2017 Solar Eclipse: Tips, What to Buy | Time.com

Americans will look skyward on Aug. 21 to witness a total solar eclipse that will cross the U.S. from coast to coast — and many will aim to photograph the eclipse to preserve the rare celestial phenomenon. During the total eclipse, the moon will block out the sun, momentarily engulfing parts of 14 states in darkness. Those who do not see a total solar eclipse will still see a partial eclipse, in which the moon blocks some of the sun’s light. Either occurrence presents a dramatic opportunity for sky gazers to capture the eclipse through photography.

Full Story:   How to Photograph the 2017 Solar Eclipse: Tips, What to Buy | Time.com